Wainscoting Solutions For Your Minimal Home

February 26, 2018

At first glance, the most modern wainscoting will be too classic for a minimal house! But on second thought, it might actually enhance the idea of simplicity dictated by the minimalist movement.

What’s the paradox with wainscoting panels?

Classic wainscoting has been around for ages. It was used by the ancient Greeks and Romans, thrived in the Victorian Britain and was known as ‘boiserie’ in France due to its ornaments. Even today, these wall panels are not often simple. The panels are often bead boards. The chair rail can still be ornamental. Wainscoting has become a substantial decorative element.

So, how does it fit in the world of minimalism?

Don’t forget that the first wall panel wainscotings were not used for decorative but practical purposes. They served as insulators on stone walls. Eventually, people discovered that these panels can actually protect their walls from getting damaged either by shoes or furniture.

Lately, bathroom wainscoting installation has become a must. And that’s because wood panels are water resistant and their resistance is enhanced when caulking and coating the boards with special semi-gloss paintings. Today, wainscoting is not only made of wood and MDF but also PVC, which is actually plastic and hence waterproof.

Now, keep these thoughts and remember what minimalism is all about

Minimalism in architecture means keeping things simple. That’s why the famous phrase ‘less is more’ by architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe makes absolute sense. The idea is to lose anything unnecessary and keep only what’s essential to achieve simplicity. From the smallest object to floors, furniture, and walls, everything is simple and free of any ornamentation. The space must give the impression of absolute order.

Over the years and due to human needs, the idea was broadened. We now often talk about semi-minimal houses, which still keep the main idea of minimalism but homes became warmer.

How does wainscoting installation fit in the minimalist approach?

A simple flat panel covering the wall from floor to ceiling will provide the calmness and clean cut lines minimalism suggests. One trick to achieve this is to only install plain panels free of ornaments. Then, it’s also important to focus on colors. Minimalism loves white, black, and gray because they are natural and not disturbing. They enhance the looks of the space without stuffing it.

In terms of function, panels can also be used as cabinet doors in hallways or other rooms to hide wiring, plumbing, or even stuff we keep in the house. They also cover damaged corners and wall cracks and other imperfections. And so they offer practical solutions while keeping the space clean.

Where does recessed lighting fit in the story?

Big openings and lots of natural light are parts of the minimalist approach since light is an essential element to living in simple structures but living well.

And then, think of the pot light design. They are as simple as light fixtures can get. Recessed in the ceiling, you don’t even notice they are there but still have the intensity of light you want.

Not that minimalism wouldn’t welcome big light fixtures. In fact, some minimal kitchens, dining rooms or living rooms feature oversized pendants in the most modern but simply cut forms.

But which option can be more minimal from pot lights, which are completely off sight?

Minimal homes often have an industrial look since they are stripped down to only the essentials. Of course, not all homes are built in ‘industrial sizes’ or can strictly follow the minimalistic approach. Hence, the reason for the growth of semi-minimalism.

In either case, a white washed wall wainscoting and recessed lighting will enhance the minimalistic rules of simplicity. By choosing the right products and colors, you achieve purity and clarity. And these are the qualities for essential living.