Kamil Idris on the IP Crisis

August 7, 2018

Globalization helps both the developed and the developing countries. For countries like the United States, globalization allows them to sell exported goods, thus earning them more money. Contrarily, developing countries, because of globalization, have the opportunity to purchases goods from other places for a cheaper price. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for intellectual property; developing countries benefit from intellectual property because that new knowledge is what creates economic growth. However, that knowledge is often taken from developed countries.

 

If you’ve read or watched the news lately, you’ve likely seen the ongoing discussion between the United States and China about tariffs and intellectual property. According to the Trump Administration, China has stolen information and knowledge from technology companies in the United States. In an effort to stop this information from further spreading to the Chinese, Trump blocked China from purchasing Qualcomm, a telecommunications company.

 

The problem is, on the business side of things, sometimes this knowledge has to be spread. For example, in order to create a product that is approved, and that the Chinese people can use, social media platforms like Facebook have to work closely with the Chinese government. While developing another app for the Chinese people, Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, was required to share information about how the Facebook app worked, thus giving them intellectual property.

While some argue that intellectual property rights have many negative aspects, Professor Kamil Idris, argues that this transfer of information is critical for economic growth. However, he also firmly believes that these rights need to be protected. Professor Kamil Idris argues that, in regard to intellectual property, the most import thing to consider is how and why IP infrastructure is important. In order to protect these companies, more importance needs to be placed on IP infrastructure. To achieve this, countries need to be willing to hire IP specialists who have the expertise to deal with the IP challenges that are happening.

 

Professor Kamil Idris serves as the President of the International Court of Arbitration and Mediation. Throughout his career, Professor Idris has gained a great amount of expertise regarding intellectual property. He graduated from Khartoum University, in Sudan, with a Bachelor of Law. Professor Kamil Idris also earned three a Bachelor of Arts degree from Cairo University in political science, economic theories, and philosophy.